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Suggested cross-curricular extension activities

Here we have suggested a variety of extension ideas linked into different curriculum subjects. The children can do them individually, in pairs, in groups or as a whole class activity.

Cross-curricular extension activities for 4 to 7 year olds

Science

  • Name their 5 senses and write an explanation of how each one helps keep them safe out and about.
  • List different light sources inside the house. Then list different light sources out in the streets. Illustrate by drawings or cutting pictures from magazines.
  • Cut up squares of different coloured paper and carry out experiments in a darkened room, to see which colours show up more clearly. Make charts of which colours are best.

ICT

  • Research how a reflector works.
  • Create their own letter (as a word document) thanking Nationwide for the reflective Cats' Eyes that helps them to be seen and safe. They should choose a font that they like and spell check the letter at the end. Then save it in a file named 'being seen keeping safe'.
  • Make a document about seeing and being seen. Make word lists and use the on-line dictionary to type out all
    the meanings.

PSHE/PSE/Health & Wellbeing/PD&MU & Citizenship

  • Write a story about visiting their grandparents and going to a Bonfire Night firework display. Include how they would help keep their grandparents safe by being seen.
  • List all the hazards that they might face if out near traffic at dusk, in the dark, in bright sunlight.
  • Design a leaflet for their parents telling them about the importance of wearing something reflective at night. Have them put all the facts about drivers, the dangers and how they can help keep safe.

English

  • Look up the following words to find the exact meaning - danger/risk/pedestrian/driver/reflective.
  • Write their own rhyme or jingle to help them remember to wear something white or reflective to be seen by drivers at night.
  • See how many smaller words they can make out of 'reflectors'.

Geography

  • Take a sheet divided into four quarters. Draw their local streets in one section on a bright sunny day, on another at night, on another on a dull rainy day and in the other a snowy, icy day. Describe how best it is to make sure they are seen by other road users in each picture.
  • List all the reflective items that are out in the street - think about road signs, road workers clothing,
    'Cats' Eyes' etc.
  • Make a safer route to school plan. If possible mark on it all the well lit places.

History

  • Find out who invented the 'Cats' Eyes'.
  • Research the invention of the motor car.
  • Write a description of roads in Great Britain when driving was still 'new' and not many cars were on the roads.

Maths

  • Carry out a class survey to see how many wear, or carry, something white or light at night or carry torches, and how many wear something reflective. Make block graphs to show findings.
  • Keep a daily diary of what time it gets dark. What is the difference after the clocks go back?
  • Draw a variety of shapes and the shadows that would be made if a strong light came from the side.

 Cross-curricular extension activities for 7 to 11 year olds 

Science

  • Research different materials that reflect. Make charts to show which are more effective.
  • Draw the tiny prisms that reflectors are made of and show on a diagram how light rays are deflected
    and reflected.
  • Research different animals that utilise and produce light - fireflies, luminous fish etc. and those that reflect light back (e.g. cat's eyes).

ICT

  • Research on-line and find out more about 'Cats' Eyes' and their development from Percy Shaw to today.
  • Create their own document that they would send to an editor. They can cut and paste, edit, highlight, enter new text and save document in different layouts, fonts and font sizes.
  • Research data to find out how many children are hurt or injured in poor weather/or at night each year in
    this country.

PSHE/PSE/Health & Wellbeing/PD&MU & Citizenship

  • Search for newspaper articles, or radio or television reports on the clocks going back. Make their own file about how different media report it.
  • Imagine a world where no one cared about others. What might happen out on the roads at night? Write a creative story about the consequences.
  • Create a campaign to help all your neighbours to realise how important it is to be seen, to be safe. Where would you start, what would you do, how would you advertise it?

English

  • Look up the following words in a dictionary, then write an explanation in own words: Reflective/reflection/refraction/fluorescent/luminous.
  • Have them imagine they are Percy Shaw. Write in the style of a diary - how he had the idea and developed it into the 'Cats' Eyes' we know.
  • Create their own crossword with clues to each word answer, using words to do with being safe being seen.

Geography

  • Research countries that have little daylight hours. Find out how they make sure they are seen clearly when they travel about.
  • Street lights are important to help road users see clearly at night. Research how high these are placed in different places and how far they are set apart on different roads.
  • Make a plan of their local area and which places are well lit, which are more dangerous in shadow etc.

History

  • Research who invented the light bulb, an invention we take for granted today. Write how the invention
    changed our lives.
  • How were street lights originally lit, before electric lights replaced them? Write a report on how the early road system worked at night.
  • Research the history of military uniforms with bright colours, and how they use camouflage in dangerous situations to merge into the background. Relate this to being on the road, and how the opposite is necessary - the need to stand out!

Maths

  • Carry out a school survey to see how many pupils ride their bike at dusk or dark, needing their lights on (extend this to how many wear or carry something reflective, besides the reflectors on the bike).
  • Draw as many 3D shapes as possible, including a prism.
  • The faces of the shapes in a prism reflector, tessellate. Draw a range of patterns with tessellating shapes.