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The interactive activities

Click on a link below to take you directly to the information for that activity:

Using the resources

If you are playing on a personal computer, just move the mouse to click on the controls at the bottom of the screen for the story and in the interactive activities.

If you are playing on an interactive whiteboard, touch the buttons at the base of the board for the story.

Carol and Tony story book (4 to 7)

Carol and Tony The story book is a fun activity where pages can be turned and read out aloud. You can also choose to play the narration which synchronises with highlighted words. Please note, there is an accessible version of the story which can be accessed via the Accessibility link on the site.

Aim: To introduce basic understanding of in-car safety, using safer crossing places and learning the Green Cross Code in a fun and engaging way, whilst enabling literacy development at two levels.

Methodology: Please use a mouse as normal.

  • Click on the 'Story' button to access the main story. Click on the 'Easy' button to access the simpler one sentence version
  • The 'Contents' button takes you to the contents page showing the three chapters
  • The 'Play' button has the story read out aloud with synchronised words highlighting
  • The 'Pause' button allows individual words to be selected for discussion
  • Select '1', '2' or '3' to go to chapters '1', '2' or '3'
  • Use the 'Stop' button to stop the story being read out aloud
  • Use the 'arrow' keys on the far right of the screen to turn pages forwards or backwards.

Issues covered in the story:

Chapter 1
A mother is driving her daughter Carol, and disabled son Tony, in the car. Carol and Tony are keen to get permission from their mum to 'walk' to school as part of 'Walk to School' week instead of being driven in the car. Their mum agrees but insists on them all using safer crossing places.

Issues raised for further discussion/extension work:

  • PSHE/PSE/Health & Wellbeing/PD&MU & Citizenship
    • family members arguing, different points of view and explaining and understanding
    • being responsible, looking after and caring for those less able
    • awareness of other people.
  • Literacy
    • emphasis on reading leaflets (about 'Walk to School' week shown in an illustration)
    • punctuation and speech
    • mood and tone of conversations
    • alliteration 'snugly strapped in'
    • playful use of words 'rolling' to describe how Tony would 'walk' to school.
  • Road safety issues
    • the importance of wearing a seatbelt
    • realising that drivers need to concentrate whilst driving, to avoid dangers on the road
    • recognising safer crossing places such as a Zebra crossing
    • incorporating 'Walk to School' week ethos into their everyday lives
    • considerations of being aware and helping a wheelchair user out of the car safely.

Chapter 2
Carol, Tony and their mum set out to walk to school. They all make sure they are fully prepared by wearing reflectors and bright clothing. On their journey, they choose safer crossing places, particularly for the wheelchair. Mum finds it hard work pushing a wheelchair but is helped by her daughter.

Issues raised for further discussion/extension work:

  • PSHE/PSE/Health & Wellbeing/PD&MU & Citizenship
    • consideration for less physically able people
    • keeping safe
    • kindness, offering to help.
  • Literacy
    • different words for 'said' such as 'chuckled', 'started', 'moaned', 'puffed' and 'offered'
    • recognising safer crossing place signs, such as the 'subway' and the School Crossing Patroller's 'stop' sign on his 'lollipop' stick.
  • Road safety issues
    • using reflectors, bright clothing and fluorescent materials to make themselves more conspicuous to road users
    • using safer crossing places that help less physically able people to cross safely and recognising key elements of Pelican crossings and subways
    • making choices about the most appropriate place to cross, considering busy traffic and physical restrictions
    • recognition of how a School Crossing Patroller can help people cross the road safely.

Chapter 3
Carol talks with a friend about her experience of walking to school with her mum and brother. Her school teacher, Mrs Taylor, asks all the children to keep a diary of their experiences of walking to school, asking them to remember the key points from the Green Cross Code: 'stop', 'look', 'listen' and 'think'.

Issues raised for further discussion/extension work:

  • PSHE/PSE/Health & Wellbeing/PD&MU & Citizenship
    • empathy for others, consideration for how difficult pushing a wheelchair is
    • how walking is good for our health
    • walking rather than driving is a positive environmental factor
    • discussing topics in class respectfully, thoughtfully.
  • Literacy
    • keeping a diary to help develop expression and writing skills.
  • Road safety issues
    • the difficulty of pushing a wheelchair out near roads
    • the importance of using safer crossing places, and choosing the most sensible option
    • remembering key points from the Green Cross Code: 'stop', 'look', 'listen' and 'think'.

Read the 'Carol and Tony' story book. |

Crack the Code (7 to 11)

Carol and Tony

There are six road safety message codes that can to be cracked. The codes are a variety of letters (alphabetical letters reversed from z-a), numbers (1-26) and symbols (found on a keyboard). Can you crack them?

Aim: To crack as many codes as possible in the given time to see the road safety message.

Methodology: Using the code key at the bottom of the screen, make a selection. If a wrong letter is chosen, it won't be entered. If a correct selection is made the letter will appear on the right hand page of the book. As each letter is correctly selected to form words in a sentence, the road safety message can be read in full.

Play the 'Crack the Code' game. |

Safety Secrets (7 to 11)

Safety Secrets

There are five road safety pictures which can be pieced together using the jigsaw pieces. Jigsaws '1' and '2' have 16 pieces and jigsaws '3', '4' and '5' have 25 pieces in each. Can you place all the jigsaw pieces in the right positions to find the 'bigger picture'?

Aim: To complete all of the jigsaw game pictures and see and read the road safety message.

Methodology: When a jigsaw piece is selected, the border will highlight. To rotate the piece, click the rotate symbol at the bottom of the screen; it will turn 90° clockwise with each rotation. Drag the jigsaw piece to your preferred place on the jigsaw area on the right hand side of the book. The area where you select to drop the piece will automatically highlight. If you have selected incorrectly, the jigsaw piece will simply return to its original place on the left hand side of the book and you can try again. When each picture jigsaw is completed a confirmation screen will appear with an important road safety message.

Play the 'Safety Secrets' game. |

  Unlock the Letters (7 to 11)  

Carol and Tony

There are six missing words in each of the Green Cross Code sentences. Can you unlock the letters to complete the missing words in the sentences? Please note, there is an accessible version of the game which can be accessed via the Accessibility link on the site.

Aim: To complete all of the missing words in each of the Green Cross Code sentences.

Methodology: Read the sentences and try to think of the missing word, in sequence, by looking at the number of spaces. The dial at the side contains all the letters of the alphabet. To select a letter, move the dial handle clockwise or anti-clockwise and release. If you choose the wrong letter, it simply won't appear and you will hear an 'error' sound. If you choose correctly, the letter will appear on the right hand page of the book. Once the sentence is completed it will be read out. To receive a hint, click the 'hint' button on the screen and the missing words will momentarily appear. If you are using an interactive whiteboard, you can use the track pad at the bottom right of the screen.

Game site (accessible version): Each incomplete sentence will be read out and a sound will be heard for each letter of a missing word. To hear the sentence again press the 'spacebar' key on your keyboard. Use the left or right arrows on your keyboard to scroll through the letters and press the 'Return' key to enter. You can also click the arrows on the screen and click the 'OK' button to enter the letter. Each letter will be read out as you scroll. To receive a hint, press the 'H' key or click the 'Hint' button on the screen; the sentence will be read out in full. Once each sentence is complete, it will be read out.

Play the 'Unlock the Letters' game. |